BBC study: VR must take audiences on a journey

Virtual reality must capitalise on its unique possibilities and take audiences on a journey if it is to take off, according to an extensive 14-week study by the BBC and research firm Ipsos Connect.

A mixture of teens and adults, who had an interest in VR but little experience of it, were given VR equipment for the long-term research programme to discover what part the emerging medium could play in consumers’ lives.

In a blog post setting out the findings, BBC Audiences senior market analyst Tim Fiennes said the results revealed how VR c

The complete article is only available to Natural History Network Members. If you are a member, please login to your account by clicking here.

BBC's Life in the Air- the tech that made it happen

Capturing animals in flight in some of the world’s toughest locations required some unorthodox kit, says Simon Bell

Filming the Australian outback’s most iconic animal required a custom car job that would make Mad Max proud. 

Long famed for its role in Mel Gibson’s post-apocalyptic trilogy, Broken Hill is the gateway to Australia’s Red Centre, mor

The complete article is only available to Natural History Network Members. If you are a member, please login to your account by clicking here.

Discovery's Eaten Alive

The Discovery Channel’s overhyped “Eaten Alive” episode Sunday evening disappointed viewers for failing to deliver on its promise to show the ultimate man-versus-nature showdown. The promotional ads boasted that naturalist Paul Rosolie, armed with a “snake-proof suit,” would allow himself to be eaten by an anaconda. But Rosolie did not go into “the belly of the beast.” Nowhere close. He didn’t even get in the anaconda’s jaws.

by Chris Palmer and Shannon Lawrence
 

Source Washington Post  9/12/2014

The bait-and-switch move infuriated viewers. But false advertising was not the worst crime committed.

The complete article is only available to Natural History Network Members. If you are a member, please login to your account by clicking here.

BBC's Wendy Darke: The first women to head the Natural History Unit.

Marine biologist Dr Wendy Darke, the first woman to head the BBC Natural History Unit in its 56-year history, is a break from tradition - and not just for reaching such a senior level in what remains a male-dominated genre.

Many of her 10 male predecessors in the world-renowned BBC wildlife programme-making department came to the top job after producing the landmark documentary

The complete article is only available to Natural History Network Members. If you are a member, please login to your account by clicking here.

Recent Features

UK Fact Ent Commissioners -Whatever next !

NHN's Festival Buzz Track were at BAFTA last week for the Televisual...
Read more...

Disney SVOD to launch 2018

Streaming video on demand has completely taken over the media market. From Netflix...
Read more...

Films at 59’s picture post on landmark BBC series Blue Planet II

If anyone's watched last night's episode of Blue Planet II we're...
Read more...